Can Testosterone Therapy Help Older Men and Women?

Testosterone TherapyTestosterone therapy continues to be a hot topic as it applies to aging men and menopausal women. The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported that the treatment phase of a clinical trial involving older men and testosterone supplement was discontinued before completion because of the significant adverse effects on men in the test group. The purpose of the study was to determine if daily application of synthetic, prescription testosterone gel to the skin would improve muscle strength and mobility, leading to greater independence for this population.

The purposed six month trial was started with 209 men whose average age was 74. While the placebo group appeared unaffected negatively, 23 of the 106 men in the testosterone therapy group reported a higher rate of heart attacks and elevated blood pressure. These adverse reactions warranted stopping the clinical study of the synthetic testosterone gel before its completion. As a result, the original question, whether this type of therapy can assist in improved mobility, remains to be answered.

Finally, the Cochrane Library, an international research evaluation organization has reported that testosterone therapy in post menopausal women may improve sexual function. The down side is the reduction in HDL or “good” cholesterol that seems to be affected. The study involved 23 clinical trials and almost 2000 women over a six month period. There appeared to be no other significant changes as related to breast cancer, mood changes, fatigue, or sense of well being.

In conclusion, the jury is still out on the value of testosterone therapy in both older men and women. Further research will be necessary before any conclusive indications can be realized and supported.

Finally, the Cochrane Library, an international research evaluation organization has reported that testosterone therapy in post menopausal women may improve sexual function. The down side is the reduction in HDL or “good” cholesterol that seems to be affected. The study involved 23 clinical trials and almost 2000 women over a six month period. There appeared to be no other significant changes as related to breast cancer, mood changes, fatigue, or sense of well being.

In conclusion, the jury is still out on the value of synthetic testosterone therapy in both older men and women. Further research will be necessary before any conclusive indications can be realized and supported.